The whitsun weddings larkin philip. A Short Analysis of Philip Larkin’s ‘The Whitsun Weddings’ 2019-02-23

The whitsun weddings larkin philip Rating: 5,4/10 1035 reviews

The Whitsun Weddings Themes

the whitsun weddings larkin philip

Read your poem out loud. That Whitsun, I was late getting away: Not till about One-twenty on the sunlit Saturday Did my three-quarters-empty train pull out, All windows down, all cushions hot, all sense Of being in a hurry gone. Are those arrows, and that falling rain, even a veiled allusion to what will happen on the wedding night? Short quotations and carefully selected colours and images should be used to reflect the mood. Postwar ennui in Britain reached an all-time high in the years following 1945. But towards the end of the poem, the poet realizes the importance of marriage. In these lines the poet expresses his realization of importance of marriage. He notes the different classes of people involved, each with their own responses to the occasion - the fathers, the uncles, the children, the unmarried female relatives.

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The Whitsun Weddings by Philip Larkin: Summary and Critical Analysis

the whitsun weddings larkin philip

What I personally got from my reading was that it was truthful, honest and real. The poem on the surface level is a description of these experiences of that particular day. Although a critically acclaimed poet I feel his poems are just too 'deep' to enjoy the anthology. They have to depend on that day. Larkin's work frequently appears in A level English specifications and the ideas presented here could be adapted for work with Post-16 students. Larkin has always been, first and foremost, an observer and a note-taker of life; a librarian of the moments, but not really taking part in it.

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Lesson on 'The Whitsun Weddings' by Philip Larkin

the whitsun weddings larkin philip

Larkin in his train journey noticed the couples just married at different stations. Now fields were building-plots and poplars cast Long shadows over major roads, and for Some fifty minutes, that in time would seem Just long enough to settle hats and say I nearly died, A dozen marriages got under way. Toads Revisited Walking around in the park Should feel better than work: The lake, the sunshine, The grass to lie on, Blurred playground noises Beyond black-stockinged nurses - Not a bad place to be. As is, though their rhythm and tone can lead to some great movements of the tongue and mouth, my enjoyment was lessened and I barely felt anything as I did so. I thought of London spread out in the sun, Its postal districts packed like squares of wheat: There we were aimed. Pay close, sustained attention to what you see outside your window.

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The Whitsun Weddings Themes

the whitsun weddings larkin philip

It reads easily and well, and Larkin never allows the meter and rhyme to get in the way of image; in short, Larkin combines the best traits of both lyric and narrative poetry, and packages them up neatly for the reader in small verse of purest pleasure. Larkin is not the worst of them by a long shot and I sensed in myself a wish to know more, but this volume is so short on back story, so short on an interesting introduction, that I decided the publisher had made an effort to be reticent on the basis of preserving this high art in a form the poet would of preferred or because they were cheap and decided to suck me in with some nice cover art. Essential Beauty and Sunny Prestatyn are my favourites. I found the kitchen-sink nature of the poems appealing: no high-falutingness for Mr Larkin. I saw the Whitsun Weddings and just loved the cover art.

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Philip Larkin: Whitsun

the whitsun weddings larkin philip

You can see how it was: Look at the pictures and the cutlery. A devotee of Yeats, Hardy, and Dylan Thomas, Larkin never wears his influences too far away from his sleeve, but don't begrudge him that; marvel, instead, that in the turbulent anything-goes sixties lived a poet, misanthrope, and mil Philip Larkin, The Whitsun Weddings Faber, 1964 Philip Larkin's fifth collection of poetry, The Whitsun Weddings, was the one that firmly established him as one of Britain's major poets. His use of rhetorical techniques are excellent but this isn't an anthology to pick up for some light reading, the final stanza of every poem is a pain as his underlying message must be worked out from his ambiguous prose. Once the tableaux are ready, view them as a class and use thought-tracking to explore how the poem's narrator becomes curious and begins to reflect on the events 'down the long cool platforms'; the thoughts of the people on the platforms; and the thoughts of the newly-wed couples. None of this cares for us.

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Whitsun by Philip Larkin

the whitsun weddings larkin philip

His poetry and poems, such as The Whitsun Weddings, was written in such a way that it reflected the lack of importance of Britain in a post-war world, and also echoed the changes that Britain was going through. His poetry takes things and makes them ordinary and commonplace, and it is partially due to the fact that Larkin strove to write simple poetry. Time permitting, students could carry out some research on 1950s period fashion and trains. He is put in an uneasy situation and starts mocking the appearances of those married couples and their relatives. The Whitsun Weddings Analysis Stanza 1 Larkinian poems focus on microcosm worlds, full of the daily hustle and bustle of people getting about their business. Each word of his poems and prose works is a protest against romance and increased emotionality. It took an essay entitled 'Making the mundane magnificent' for me to truly appreciate Larkin's wonderfully refreshing honesty.

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Lesson on 'The Whitsun Weddings' by Philip Larkin

the whitsun weddings larkin philip

Again, rain is the traditional symbol of fertility. Okay, I've just spent two paragraphs describing the best of Larkin's work. It has always been supposed the poem was based on an actual train journey Larkin made in 1955 on Whitsun Saturday, a day which was popular for weddings at that time though since there was a rail strike on that weekend Larkin scholar John Osborne now thinks the journey an unlikely one to have taken place. I came across a reference to An Arundel Tomb recently and I remembered how much I enjoyed the poems, so I dug out the collection. They watched the landscape, sitting side by side - An Odeon went past, a cooling tower, And someone running up to bowl - and none Thought of the others they would never meet Or how their lives would all contain this hour. Philip Larkin, a 20th Century poet, was primarily a Librarian at Hull University, but also wrote Jazz reviews and novels. Larkin in a great poet.

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The Whitsun Weddings Background

the whitsun weddings larkin philip

It is perhaps in the poems that depict England herself—menaced by selfish elites, reduced by vulgarity and cheap goods, yet alive even in the vanishing of her customs and traditions—that Larkin is most impressive. Larkinian poems are never about a bright future, but always hinting at an unhappiness that is just below the surface. Some of the best of the poems are so pared down but poignant, like Home is so Sad or deft and witty like Days. Doncaster, Retford, Grantham, Newark, Peterborough, and at every station more wedding parties. Anyway, the author was against poetry singing of romantic love, because he considered that style as hypocritical and therefore, emotionally onerous for a reader.

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A Short Analysis of Philip Larkin’s ‘The Whitsun Weddings’

the whitsun weddings larkin philip

Larkin admits that he had actually mistaken the sounds of merriment from the wedding guests for whoops and other noises from the station porters, and it is only gradually that he comes to realise the pattern of wedding parties at each railway station. The Whitsun Weddings is a collection of 32 poems that focus of the mundanity of everyday life and the small things that people barely notice. It might also be significant that the poem focuses on saying goodbye, on leaving things behind: Larkin is leaving Hull behind at the start of the poem he had moved to Hull in 1955, and would live and work in the city for the rest of his life ; the newlyweds are leaving behind their loved ones and climbing aboard the train, taking their first steps on their new life together; their families are waving them off from the platform. For Larkin, poetry was business, and rock and roll and sex moved the younger generation, not poetry, which he could not compete with. We slowed again, And as the tightened brakes took hold, there swelled A sense of falling, like an arrow-shower Sent out of sight, somewhere becoming rain. Larkin saw himself as an artist, and therefore believed that the audience he was trying to reach could not understand him, even with his best attempts at communicating with them.

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