The militant song movement in latin america chile uruguay and argentina. The militant song movement in Latin America : Chile, Uruguay, and Argentina 2019-03-26

The militant song movement in latin america chile uruguay and argentina Rating: 4,8/10 1250 reviews

The Militant Song Movement In Latin America Chile Uruguay And Argentina

the militant song movement in latin america chile uruguay and argentina

Category: Music and Dance The Militant Song Movement in Latin America: Chile, Uruguay, and Argentina Edited by Pablo Vila. In the second half of the chapter, Ju√°rez turns her attention to a series of courses started by Uruguayan musicologist and composer Cori√ļn Aharoni√°n, who became a driving force behind a politicized avant-garde music movement in Uruguay in the 1970s. Previous studies on the music of protest in South America were piecemeal. Throughout the book, the contribution of the most important musicians of the movement Violeta Parra, V√≠ctor Jara, Patricio Manns, Quilapay√ļn, Inti-Illimani, etc. This book is an initial attempt to overcome this deficit. La Cantata Popular Santa Mar√≠a de Iquique? Without an account of how music was pervasively used in the construction of the emotional components that always accompany political action, any explanation of what occurred in Latin America during that period will be always partial.

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The militant song movement in Latin America : Chile, Uruguay, and Argentina

the militant song movement in latin america chile uruguay and argentina

The Second Canto Popular generation in the 1970s - Camila Juarez Chapter 6: The Rhythm of Values: Poetry and Music in Uruguay, 1960-85 - Maria L. Through the carefully selected chapters, one gains both an understanding of the global influences informing these song movements and of the unique local contributions that shaped the rich histories of militant song in the Southern Cone. Each chapter is thoughtfully constructed and the translated chapters are carefully edited to read smoothly. Drawing upon valuable historical resources, interviews and a vast repertoire of songs, the book is a valuable reference that highlights not only the role of the singers in this enduring movement, but also the political dimension that is allowed to preserve its emotive aspect. From the Cuban Revolution to the massive guerrilla movements in Argentina, Uruguay, Peru, Colombia, and most of Central America, to the democratic socialist experiment of Allende in Chile, to the increased popularity of socialist-oriented parties in Uruguay, or para-social Latin America in the 1960s and 1970s underwent a profound and often violent process of social change. Drawing on multiple rich ethnographic interviews with artists, the chapter includes an analysis of the contributions made by Horacio Guarany and Mercedes Sosa as well as less internationally renowned artists such as Marián Farías Gómez of the group Huanca Hua.

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Pablo Vila: The Militant Song Movement in Latin America (ePUB)

the militant song movement in latin america chile uruguay and argentina

Previous studies on the music of protest in South America were piecemeal. In chapter 1, Nancy Morris outlines Nueva Canción the New Song movement in Chile, from its inception through what she sees as the three major phases of its development. The fact that the book is written in English is of particular value as it offers international audiences a chance to enter the nuanced and even at times contradictory narratives shaping the history of Latin American militant song. Readers living elsewhere and not caught up in these revolutions are unlikely to know the songs thus spawned, and since many of them were ephemeral and topical, few are heard today. Each chapter is thoughtfully constructed and the translated chapters are carefully edited to read smoothly. Although some contributors have an intermediate degree in musicology, all specialize in nonmusical areas.

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The Militant Song Movement in Latin America: Chile, Uruguay, and Argentina

the militant song movement in latin america chile uruguay and argentina

The collection also offers valuable perspective to anyone interested in the global political movements of the mid-twentieth century, as the addressed themes can be connected in many compelling ways to the political song movements of North America and Europe from the same time period. Chapter 5, written by Argentine scholar Camila Ju√°rez, explores avant-garde popular music traditions of the 1970s in Uruguay. From the Cuban Revolution to the massive guerrilla movements in Argentina, Uruguay, Peru, Colombia, and most of Central America, to the democratic socialist experiment of Allende in Chile, to the increased popularity of socialist-oriented parties in Uruguay, or para-socialist movements, such as the Juventud Peronista in Argentina, the idea of social change was in the air. The collection also offers valuable perspective to anyone interested in the global political movements of the mid-twentieth century, as the addressed themes can be connected in many compelling ways to the political song movements of North America and Europe from the same time period. Thus, the writers discuss militant songs in relation to complex political movements. Although some contributors have an intermediate degree in musicology, all specialize in nonmusical areas. Now, the prominent scholar of Latin American popular music Pablo Vila has edited a diverse collection of critical essays on militant song in Chile, Uruguay, and Argentina with a focus on the 1950s to the 1980s.

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The Militant Song Movement in Latin America: Chile, Uruguay, and Argentina by Pablo Vila

the militant song movement in latin america chile uruguay and argentina

Lastly, Morris outlines the Andean music boom that led to the development of the less overtly politicized Canto Nuevo movement. Although this topic has been explored from a political and social point of view, there is an aspect that has remained fairly unexplored. In this collection of essays, we examine the history of the militant song movement in Chile, Uruguay, and Argentina at the peak of its popularity from the mid-1960s to the coup d etats in the mid-1970s , considering their different political stances and musical deportments. In conclusion, I can only hope that more volumes of a similar nature emerge, continuing to untangle the many inspiring music-making practices that emerged from one the darkest periods in Latin American history. This volume breaks new ground in research on the period and should prove indispensable to those interested in Latin America or in popular music more generally.

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The militant song movement in Latin America : Chile, Uruguay, and Argentina (Book, 2014) [in10.com.br]

the militant song movement in latin america chile uruguay and argentina

Please, see if you are eligible to read or download The Militant Song Movement In Latin America Chile Uruguay And Argentina by creating an account. Moving into the realm of comparative analysis, she offers a detailed account of all the recorded cuecas connected to the New Song movement, highlighting particular cases where songs differed from standard song style and form. Figueredo Chapter 7: Atahualpa Yupanqui: the Latin American Precursor of the Militant Song Movement -Carlos Molinero and Pablo Vila Chapter 8: A Brief History of the Militant Song Movement in Argentina - Carlos Molinero and Pablo Vila Chapter 9: The Revolutionary Patria and Its New Wo Men: Gendered Tropes of Political Agency and Popular Identity in Argentine Folk Music of the Long 1960s - Illa Carrillo Rodríguez Latin America in the 1960s and 1970s underwent a profound and often violent process of social change. Thus, the writers discuss militant songs in relation to complex political movements. The cultural-and especially musical-dimension of this movement, so vital in order to comprehend the extent of its emotional appeal, has not been fully documented. Throughout the book, the contribution of the most important musicians of the movement Violeta Parra, Victor Jara, Patricio Manns, Quilapayun, Inti-Illimani, etc.

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The militant song movement in Latin America : Chile, Uruguay, and Argentina (Book, 2015) [in10.com.br]

the militant song movement in latin america chile uruguay and argentina

While men were the protagonists of the militant song movement, the majority of the essays in this volume are written by women, offering a refreshing balance of gender perspectives from both Latin American and international scholars from a diversity of disciplines. She argues that institutional support of national music programs in the 1960s contributed heavily to the boom of conservatory-based forms of popular music in Uruguay in the 1970s. Abstract: When Salvador Allende was elected president of Chile in 1970, a banner proclaimed, 'There is no revolution without songs. A movement that 'has outlived the historical conditions that engendered them,' as Nancy Morris states in her contribution, the relevance of the militant song, epitomised in particular by the Chilean experience of memory in relation to the epoch, needs a constant regeneration to avoid the pitfalls of the political periphery. Drawing upon valuable historical resources, interviews and a vast repertoire of songs, the book is a valuable reference that highlights not only the role of the singers in this enduring movement, but also the political dimension that is allowed to preserve its emotive aspect.

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The militant song movement in Latin America : Chile, Uruguay, and Argentina

the militant song movement in latin america chile uruguay and argentina

The cultural and especially musical dimension of this movement, so vital in order to comprehend the extent of its emotional appeal, has not been fully documented. Responsibility: edited by Pablo Vila. From the Cuban Revolution to the massive guerrilla movements in Argentina, Uruguay, Peru, Colombia, and most of Central America, to the democratic socialist experiment of Allende in Chile, to the increased popularity of socialist-oriented parties in Uruguay, or para-socialist movements, such as the Juventud Peronista in Argentina, the idea of social change was in the air. It was a period when singing and performing music were integral to the urgent debates and grass roots movements playing out in spaces of terror and of solidarity. Each chapter is thoughtfully constructed and the translated chapters are carefully edited to read smoothly. This piece, written by Luis Advis in 1969, was the first folk cantata of its kind, bridging the worlds of art music and folk music in new ways. The contributors to the collection deal with the complex relationship that the aesthetic of the movement established between the political content of the lyrics and the musical and performative aspects of the most popular songs of the period.

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The Militant Song Movement in Latin America: Chile, Uruguay, and Argentina

the militant song movement in latin america chile uruguay and argentina

Gonz√°lez argues that cueca must be considered one of the key song forms of the revolutionary soundtrack of Latin America from the 1960s through the 1980s. Throughout the book, the contribution of the most important musicians of the movement Violeta Parra, V√≠ctor Jara, Patricio Manns, Quilapay√ļn, Inti-Illimani, etc. Vila has collected nine chapters by specialists covering Chile, Uruguay, and Argentina. Chapter 2, written by Eileen Karmy Bolton, offers readers an in-depth exploration of the Cantata Popular Santa Mar√≠a de Iquique. Without an account of how music was pervasively used in the construction of the emotional components that always accompany political action, any explanation of what occurred in Latin America during that period will be always partial. Whether they read through it as a comprehensive and diverse study of politicized song movements in Latin America, consult it as a reference book for scholars of militant song, or use it as a teaching tool, readers will not be disappointed with the contents of Vila's collection.

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